Overcoming Barriers

Overcoming Barriers

Posted: Tuesday 31 May 2016. Author: Kirstie Kelly.

Overcoming Barriers: Practical Diversity & Inclusion

Despite the best of intentions, organisations all too often don’t realise the full benefits of their investment in becoming a more diverse and inclusive workplace.

This was the collective opinion of the D&I thought leaders at Capita’s recent workshop including Jemima JeffersonAlison McDermottNeil CockroftKirstie Kelly and Fiona Morden

What we often find when we meet with a new client is that they’re facing one or more of these barriers:

If this sounds like your business, you have much in common with many organisations we meet.

Momentum for change

According to McKinsey’s Lessons from the leading-edge, the best diversity and inclusion practices

All of this resonated with our group who have seen enthusiasm for diversity and inclusion initiatives wane when they’re not part of a broader more cohesive approach to cultural transformation.

Transformative practices

So how can you begin effecting that organisational transformation? Move from process-led change to an all-encompassing culture shift?

Here are some of the most effective transformative practices we put into play:

  1. Get the top person excited: In her work, Fiona Morden says her first milestone is when she’s able to help leaders to the point where they ask ‘how’ they should address D&I, not ‘why’

The journey from compliance to commercial benefit starts with understanding the risks and commercial implications of doing nothing, as well as the positives of taking action. This might be showing leaders examples of bias in the workplace, or demonstrating their organisation’s status in comparison to competitors.”

2. Switching perspectives: Once leaders are on board with the ‘why’ it’s time to bare all about the current culture. Jemima Jefferson talked about embarking on the journey towards a more inclusive culture:

Sessions where leaders are faced with the realities in their business can kick start the transformation process by revealing the micro-inequities that affect progress in the business, and by addressing ‘invisible’ issues like benevolent bias.”

3. Communications: Are transformative. Kirstie Kelly of Launchpad Recruitstalked about the benefits of “being specific about elements of the EVP from the outset. That includes communications to broad external audiences, those who may one day enter the selection process.” 

4. Process and cultureNeil Cockroft highlighted the importance of process and culture being addressed hand in hand through a mix of hard and soft activities (and measures). For example, ensuring diverse selection pools (process) as well as training recruiting managers on the value of diverse talent pools (culture).

5. Metrics are key to the transformation process. Measures and goals help you to talk in the language of business leaders. An analytics process that models the current and future desired state of D&I in an organisation is incredibly powerful as I see daily in my client work.

I strongly believe that diversity without inclusion offers limited results.

The most inclusive workplaces are those where people are clear on the reasons for becoming a more diverse and inclusive organisation, and they choose to be part of the culture change – McKinsey’s Four Building Blocks of Change articulates the rationale for a change in mind-set through a simple visual.

Culture change means shifting attitudes, values and behaviours so that natural actions achieve the desired results, not only modifying actions that then require conscious maintenance (see Jonathan Streeton’s post on change versus transformation).

Tactical, practice orientated interventions (such as gender targeted initiatives for example) have the potential to kick start or reinvigorate change efforts. However, real transformational and sustainable D&I can only happen when the organisational mind-set and leadership behaviour evolve to be genuinely inclusive.

If you would like to learn more about diverse talent acquisition, join us at The FiRM’s spring conference for Capita’s presentation ‘From ‘Talk’ to Walk’.

Kirstie Kelly

Kirstie Kelly

Kirstie Kelly leads the diversity and inclusion practice at Capita HR Solutions. With more than 20 years in the Recruitment and HR space, Kirsty is passionate about people in business. She believes that the world of work should be a positive place and that technology is the disruptor with the potential to finally bring about that change. Kirstie was one of the founding directors of LaunchPad, a video-led technology that enables businesses to make fair, inclusive and un-biased decisions, and she’s also advisor to a number of fast-growth businesses. In her work with clients she helps businesses to change entrenched behaviours - creating systematic and engaging processes to improve decision making about people and culture. An active speaker and blogger, you'll find Kirstie musing over the subjects of the changing face of HR and business where fairness and inclusion matter.